2016 Winter Concerts | Tour Philosophy | Programming Philosophy

2016 Winter Concerts

Friday, February 12, 2016

7:30 pm
Trebelle Piano Trio

La Belle Époque:

Music of Claude Debussy
and
Ernest Chausson
Langroise Recital Hall

College of Idaho
2112 Cleveland Blvd

Caldwell, ID

Sunday, February 14, 2016

6:00 pm
Trebelle Piano Trio

La Belle Époque:

Music of Claude Debussy
and
Ernest Chausson
Sunday Sounds at Six

McCall Community Congregational Church

McCall, ID

Friday, February 19, 2016

7:30 pm
Trebelle Piano Trio

La Belle Époque:

Music of Claude Debussy
and
Ernest Chausson
Esther Simplot Performing Arts Academy

516 S 9th St

Boise, ID

Sunday, February 21, 2016

3:00 pm
Trebelle Piano Trio

La Belle Époque:

Music of Claude Debussy
and
Ernest Chausson
Eagle United Methodist Church

651 N Eagle Rd

Eagle, ID

If you would like to have Robyn perform a concert in your church or local concert hall, please contact her at the email address at this web site, or write to:

Robyn Wells
A Grand Adventure
P.O. Box 11
Nampa, ID 83653

       Tour Philosophy

When I first considered doing tours in 1993 my original goals were to perform great music, see the country, and earn enough money through donations to meet my financial needs. These three goals remain an important factor in my continuing work in this area, as I am inspired to keep learning new music and explore new areas of the U.S.

Performing in churches is a part of the tours I feel very strongly about, as it gives me a chance to share my faith as well as music. It is my desire to give glory to God by giving back to Him what He has given me.

Sometimes people ask me how I can use classical music to praise God when frequently that wasn’t the original goal of the composers. My answer is that I can, because that is what God created and equipped me to do. Whatever ability God has given us can be used for His glory, if our hearts desire is to praise Him.

Psalm 108: 3-4 says, "I will thank you among the nations, O Lord, and play music to praise you among the people, because Your love is greater than the heavens, and Your faithfulness reaches the skies."

Colossians 3:23-24 says, "Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for men... It is the Lord Christ you are serving."

Through these tours I am able to share a part of my music which can’t always be made visible in other venues. It has been a blessing over the last 15 years to see our beautiful country, make new friends, and see God’s faithfulness in providing for my needs. It is an annual reminder of God’s love and care for us.

       Programming Philosophy

Programming is an art in itself, and choosing music for a program is always a fun challenge.

A program is like a menu: all the components have to fit for it to be satisfying. I always try to start my programs with an "Appetizer" - a piece or two which will immediately make an audience happy they came to the concert. Follow that with the "Main Course" - a sonata, suite, or collection of pieces which are the "meat and potatoes" of the program - the main body around which everything else revolves. There must be several "Side Dishes" - pieces which complement the main course, but which also have enough merit and substance to be enjoyable on their own. And lastly, a "Dessert" - a closing piece which leaves the audience feeling satisfied and which completes the menu by leaving a good taste in the mouth (or ear!) If an audience desires an encore, it should be a light, enjoyable piece which leaves a nice finish.

For my programs, I like to choose pieces which have some sort of connective tissue to tie them together. It doesn’t have to be the same throughout the program, though the Italian and French programs were certainly mono-thematic. However, finding combinations of works which fit together nicely is a wonderful way to show the different flavors of music while still exhibiting the uniqueness of each nationality, compositional period, or style. For example, having a set of Nocturnes by three different composers can show the evolution of the form over time, while still retaining the mood of a "night song" in each. Or perhaps combining two composers from different eras whose music contains common threads. Even key signature sometimes plays a role.

Whatever process is used in determining a program, the end result should always be something that will be enjoyable to the audience, as well as being stimulating to the performer. If everyone involved in the concert can walk away happy at the end of it, it may be considered successful!

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